Victor

Galaz


PhD

Deputy science director

+46 8 674 70 83

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Staff profile

Victor Galaz is an Associate Professor and Senior Lecturer in political science and deputy science director at the centre

Profile summary

  • Victor Galaz's research elaborates the major governance challenges posed by Earth system complexity, planetary boundaries, and the Anthropocene
  • He has acted as expert advisor for the International Commission on
    Climate Change and Development, as well as for the Convention on
    Biological Diversity (CBD) on geo-engineering issues
  • He is a regular contributor in the Swedish public and policy debate about environmental policy and emerging technologies

He is also the present coordinator of the Earth System Governance Research Centre Stockholm. Among his publications in English are articles in the journals Environment, Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, Ecological Economics, Public Administration, Environmental Politics, Ambio, Ecology and Society, and Governance.

Victor Galaz's research elaborates the major governance challenges posed by Earth system complexity, planetary boundaries, and the Anthropocene.

He has acted as expert advisor for the International Commission on Climate Change and Development, as well as for the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) on geo-engineering issues. His work has been featured in international media such as Wired, The Guardian, New Scientist and Nature. He is a regular contributor in the Swedish public and policy debate about environmental policy and emerging technologies.

His current research interests are in global environmental governance, planetary boundaries, emerging technologies and emerging political conflicts associated with the notion of the Anthropocene. He is also currently working on a book entitled "Global Environmental Governance, Technology and Politics: Developments in the Anthropocene" (Edward Elgar).

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Galaz, Victor

Publications by Galaz, Victor

The potential of trait-based approaches to contribute to marine conservation

Stuart-Smith, R.D., A.E. Bates, J.S. Lefcheck, J. Emmett Duffy, S.C. Baker, R.J. Thomson, J.F. Stuart-Smith, N.A. Hill, S.J. Kininmonth, L. Airoldi, M.A. Becerro, S.J. Campbell, T.P. Dawson, S.A. Navarrete, G. Soler, E.M.A. Strain, T.J. Willis, G.J. Edgar

2015 - Journal / article

The value of diversity metrics to represent ecological communities and inform broad-scale conservation objectives and policy has often been subject to debate and uncertainty and. In practice, diversity metrics are important in setting management and conservation priorities, just as economic indices contribute to global monetary and financial policies. Thus, key challenges for ecologists are to identify new ways to view and summarise patterns in biodiversity and improve on the metrics available for management purposes. In a recent paper on functional diversity patterns in reef fishes, we highlighted the potential of new insights gained from functional trait-based approaches to inform marine management, stressing the need to develop and refine biodiversity measures that are linked to ecology (rather than taxonomy). We used a unique, fisheries-independent reef fish identity and abundance dataset, collected using standardised methods from equatorial to high latitude regions all over the world, to provide the first global view of the distribution of individuals amongst species (including a measure of evenness) and functional traits amongst marine communities. A recent paper by Robinson et al. published in Marine Policy criticised the use of our evenness index as a measure of biodiversity, and questioned the use of functional trait-based metrics derived from surveys of standardised areas for decisions relating to broad-scale management of marine systems. In this paper we respond to Robinson et al. and rebut their claims related to sampling bias and broad-scale applicability of trait-based approaches.


Galaz, Victor

Stockholm Resilience Centre is a collaboration between Stockholm University and the Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences

Stockholm Resilience Centre
Stockholm University, Kräftriket 2B
Phone: +46 8 674 70 70
info@stockholmresilience.su.se

Organisation number: 202100-3062
VAT No: SE202100306201

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