Diego

Galafassi

MSc

PhD student, Networks and transformation

+46 768 756 741

RSS-link

Staff profile

Diego is a PhD student whose research is focused on the role of knowledge practices in social-ecological transformations

Profile summary

Diego has a MSc on Environmental Science at Bologna University

He also completed a MSc at the Stockholm Resilience Centre looking at urban regional planning

His current research seeks to understand networked dependencies and how they define network configurations

Drawing from traditions of participatory action research, whole system approaches, cognitive sciences, arts and humanities, Diego is studying transformative practices in relation to climate change and poverty alleviation in case-studies in Sweden, Kenya and Mozambique.

His methodological approach combines participatory research, network analysis, lab experiments and art-based methods.

He holds an MSc on Environmental Science from Bologna University and also did a Master's study at the Stockholm Resilience Centre.

Diego is a part of the cluster Adaptive Governance in Ekoklim program - a transdisciplinary research program at Stockholm University that addresses issues concerning climate effects on biodiversity, ecosystem services and their management and governance in Stockholm region. Diego's empirical research is also built on ongoing engagements with change agents in Kenya and Mozambique through project SPACES.

For his work on theater and film visit:
https://vimeo.com/user21402489

Share

Publications by Galafassi, Diego

Evaluating taboo trade-offs in ecosystems services and human well-being

Daw, T.M., S. Coulthard, W.W.L. Cheung, K. Brown, C. Abunge, D. Galafassi, G.D. Peterson, T.R. McClanahan, J.O. Omukoto, L. Munyi

2015 - Journal / article

Managing ecosystems for multiple ecosystem services and balancing the well-being of diverse stakeholders involves different kinds of trade-offs. Often trade-offs involve noneconomic and difficult-toevaluate values, such as cultural identity, employment, the wellbeing of poor people, or particular species or ecosystem structures. Although trade-offs need to be considered for successful environmental management, they are often overlooked in favor of winwins. Management and policy decisions demand approaches that can explicitly acknowledge and evaluate diverse trade-offs. We identified a diversity of apparent trade-offs in a small-scale tropical fishery when ecological simulations were integrated with participatory assessments of social–ecological system structure and stakeholders’ well-being. Despite an apparent win-win between conservation and profitability at the aggregate scale, food production, employment, and well-being of marginalized stakeholders were differentially influenced by management decisions leading to trade-offs. Some of these trade-offs were suggested to be “taboo” trade-offs between morally incommensurable values, such as between profits and the well-being of marginalized women. These were not previously recognized as management issues. Stakeholders explored and deliberated over trade-offs supported by an interactive “toy model” representing key system trade-offs, alongside qualitative narrative scenarios of the future. The concept of taboo trade-offs suggests that psychological bias and social sensitivity may exclude key issues from decision making, which can result in policies that are difficult to implement. Our participatory modeling and scenarios approach has the potential to increase awareness of such trade-offs, promote discussion of what is acceptable, and potentially identify and reduce obstacles to management compliance.


Evaluating taboo trade-offs in ecosystems services and human well-being

Daw. T., Coulthard, S., Cheung, W.W.L., Brown, K., Abunge, C., Galafassi, D., Peterson, G.D., McClanahan, T.R., Omukoto, J.O., Munyi, L.

2015 - Journal / article

Managing ecosystems for multiple ecosystem services and balancing the well-being of diverse stakeholders involves different kinds of trade-offs. Often trade-offs involve noneconomic and difficult-to-valuate values, such as cultural identity, employment, the well-being of poor people, or particular species or ecosystem structures. Although trade-offs need to be considered for successful environmental management, they are often overlooked in favor of win-wins. Management and policy decisions demand approaches tha can explicitly acknowledge and evaluate diverse trade-offs. We identified a diversity of apparent trade-offs in a small-scale tropical fishery when ecological simulations were integrated with participatory assessments of social–ecological system structure and stakeholders’well-being. Despite an apparent win-win between conservation and profitability at the aggregate scale, food production, employment, and well-being of marginalized stakeholders were differentially influenced by management decisions leading to trade-offs. Some of these trade-offs were suggested to be "tabo trade-offs" between morally incommensurable values, such as between profits and the well-being of marginalized women. The concept of taboo trade-offs suggests that psychological bias and social sensitivity may exclude key issues from decision making, which can result in policies that are difficult to implement. Our participatory modeling and scenarios approach has the potential to increase awareness of such trade-offs, promote discussion of what is acceptable, and potentially identify and reduce obstacles to management compliance.


Connected Risks, Connected Solutions

Galaz, V., D. Galafassi, J. Tallberg, A. Boin, E. Hey, C. Ituarte-Lima, J. Dunagan, P. Olsson, R. Österbergh, F. Westley

2014 - Policy brief or report

What are some of the best ways to address such global connected risks? Which tangible global governance pathways exist, how realistic are the existing international reform proposals, and what would they imply? These issues are explored in the newly launched report "Connected Risks, Connected Solutions?" which was recently launched during a seminar held on November 18. The report is the result of collaboration between scholars from a broad range of disciplines in several parts of the world including Jonas Tallberg (political science, Sweden), Ellen Hey (international law, Netherlands), Arjen Boin (crisis management, Netherlands) and Frances Westley (innovation studies, Canada), amongst others. Several researchers from Stockholm Resilience Centre contributed to the report, including lead author Victor Galaz , Diego Galafassi , Claudia Ituarte-Lima , and Per Olsson . The report includes the following four main messages: - Social science insights about the governance of connected global risks remain fragmented, but are complementary. - Different models of governance address different critical functions needed to govern global connected risks. - There are several highly policy-relevant research gaps with respect to innovation, legitimacy, and adaptability in the face of non-linear change. - Transformative changes of the governance of global environmental risks are, indeed, possible.


Galafassi, Diego

Stockholm Resilience Centre is a collaboration between Stockholm University and the Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences

Stockholm Resilience Centre
Stockholm University, Kräftriket 2B
Phone: +46 8 674 70 70
info@stockholmresilience.su.se

Organisation number: 202100-3062
VAT No: SE202100306201

Intranet